AMD Threadripper 2950X 16 Core 32 Thread Processor Reviews and more
Posted on: 08/14/2018 10:39 AM

Here a roundup of today's reviews and articles:

A Look At The Windows 10 vs. Linux Performance On AMD Threadripper 2990WX
AMD 2nd Gen Ryzen Threadripper 2950X And 2990WX Review
AMD 2nd Generation Ryzen Threadripper 2990X 32 Core / 64 Thread CPU Review
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X and 2990WX Review
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X Review
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX & 2950X CPU Review
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX & 2950X Review
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX and 2950X Review
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX CPU Review
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX overclocked to 5.4 GHz
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX Processor Review
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX Review
AMD Threadripper 2950X 16 Core 32 Thread Processor Review
AMD Threadripper 2950X Offers Great Linux Performance At $900 USD
AMD Threadripper 2990WX 32-Core and 2950X 16-Core Review
AMD Threadripper 2990WX Cooling Performance - Testing Five Heatsinks & Two Water Coolers
AMD Threadripper 2990WX Linux Benchmarks: The 32-Core / 64-Thread Beast
ASUS ROG SWIFT PG27UQ Monitor Review
Best PC Cases 2018: Our Tested Picks for Your New Build
BlitzWolf BW-ANC1 Active Noise Cancelling Bluetooth Earphones Review
Bond Home Smart Ceiling Fan Controller Review
Corsair Carbide SPEC-06 RGB Review
Corsair SPEC Omega RGB Review
Fnatic STREAK Review
Gigabyte B450 Aorus Pro Review
How To Test Memory Using MemTest86 Guide
Moto Z3 Review
MSI B450 Tomahawk Review
MSI B450i Gaming PLUS AC Review
MSI MEG X399 Creation Motherboard Review
MSI Radeon RX 570 and 580 MECH 2 8G OC Review
NETGEAR Orbi (RBK23) AC2200 Mesh Wi-Fi System Review
Noctua NH-U12S TR4-SP3: Legendary Cooling Comes to Threadripper
NVIDIA's Next-Gen Turing GPU: All You Need To Know
NZXT E850 850W Gold Digital Power Supply Review
PC Buyers Guide Summer 2018
Ryzen Threadripper 2 (2990WX and 2950X) Review
The Mega-Tasking Test: AMD Threadripper 2990WX Heavy Multitasking Benchmark

A Look At The Windows 10 vs. Linux Performance On AMD Threadripper 2990WX
Complementing the extensive Linux benchmarks done earlier today of the AMD Threadripper 2990WX in our review (as well as on the Threadripper 2950X), in this article are our first Windows 10 vs. Linux benchmarks of this 32-core / 64-thread $1799 USD processor. Tests were done from Microsoft Windows 10 against Clear Linux, Ubuntu 18.04, the Arch-based Antergos 18.7-Rolling, and openSUSE Tumbleweed.


Read full article @ Phoronix

AMD 2nd Gen Ryzen Threadripper 2950X And 2990WX Review
Today, AMD is officially unveiling its 2nd Generation Ryzen Threadripper processors and it hopes to scale things up even further than it did last year. There’s only so much wiggle-room left in the enthusiast segment, so with this launch AMD has also set its sights on content creation and workstation professionals, with processors that feature 24 and 32 Zen+ cores. The Threadripper WX series is somewhat of a departure from the original Threadrippers, but their massive compute capabilities and aggressive price points (relatively speaking) may prove to be highly attractive to creators that can never have enough horsepower. The Threadripper X-series gets a significant boost from the Zen+ architecture as well, however. The goal with this round of Threadrippers is to offer a better experience than the originals all-around, while also offering more performance, and maintaining full platform compatibility...


Read full article @ HotHardware

AMD 2nd Generation Ryzen Threadripper 2990X 32 Core / 64 Thread CPU Review
It was the beginning of 2017, Intel thought the year would go really smooth for them in regards to their mainstream and high-end desktop launches. Intel launched their 7th generation core family, offering consumers the same architecture, slightly enhanced process and slightly higher CPU clock speeds, calling it a day. What they didn’t know was that their rival, AMD, was going to make an epic return just a few months after and when they did, Intel’s worst fears had come to life.

While Ryzen was anticipated to arrive on the mainstream consumer platform, offering IPC on par with Intel’s latest generation processors, it was Threadripper that no one, even the press had not expected. A full-fledged lineup of high-end desktop processors designed to tackle Intel’s Core X line up. AMD’s Ryzen Threadripper and the accompanying X399 platform is designed for enthusiasts, it offered features that are not available at an incredible value while the new Zen cores delivered CPU performance on par with Intel’s modern core architectures.


Read full article @ Wccftech

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X and 2990WX Review
Today, we are talking about something that would have seen impossible just a few shorts years ago— a 32-core processor for consumers. While I realize that talking about the history of computer hardware can be considered superfluous in a processor review, I think its important to understand the context here of why this is just a momentous shift for the industry.
May 2016 marked the launch of what was then the highest core count consumer processor ever seen, the Intel Core i7-6950X. At 10 cores and 20 threads, the 6950X was easily the highest performing consumer CPU in multi-threaded tasks but came at a staggering $1700 price tag. In what we will likely be able to look back on as the peak of Intels sole dominance of the x86 CPU space, it was an impossible product to recommend to almost any consumer.
Just over a year later saw the launch of Skylake-X with the Intel Core i9-7900X. Retaining the same core count as the 6950X, the 7900X would have been relatively unremarkable on its own. However, a $700 price drop and the future of upcoming 12, 14, 16, and 18-core processors on this new X299 platform showed an aggressive new course for Intels high-end desktop (HEDT) platform.
This aggressiveness was brought on by the success of AMDs Ryzen platform, and the then upcoming Threadripper platform. Promising up to 16 cores/32 threads, and 64 lanes of PCI Express connectivity, it was clear that Intel would for the first time have a competitor on their hands in the HEDT space that they created back with the Core i7-920.
Fast forward another year, and we have the release of the 2nd Generation Threadripper. Promising to bring the same advancements we saw with the Ryzen 7 2700X, AMD is pushing Threadripper to even more competitive states with higher performance and lower cost. 


Read full article @ PC Perspective

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X Review
Ryzen Threadripper 2950X is AMD's new flagship 16-core processor. Precision Boost Overclock works wonders to further increase its performance while always being stable. Our review of the 2950X presents four data sets: stock, manual OC, PBO enabled and PBO with Local Memory Access mode.


Read full article @ TechPowerUp

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX & 2950X CPU Review
AMD teased us a bit last week by showing off its new 2nd Generation Threadripper 2990WX and 2950X packaging and specifications. This week AMD lets us share all our Threadripper data we have been collecting. The 2990WX is likely a lot different part than many people were expecting, and it turns out that it might usher AMD into a newly created market.

Last week AMD let us have a peek at its new 2nd generation Threadripper CPUs packaging and specifications. If you missed that, the video below shows you all the new Threadripper packaging, which is certainly better done than it was with the previous generation.


Read full article @ HardOCP

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX & 2950X Review
Time has finally come. Today we are bringing you our full review of the Threadripper 2990WX and Threadripper 2950X. Although these two CPUs share the same basic DNA, you should know they are very different processors, targeting completely different market segments.

Since they were announced earlier this year, everyone's attention has been fixed firmly on the 32-core/64-thread 2nd Gen Threadripper part, now known as the 2990WX, coming in at $1800. There will be two models in the WX series and for those wondering the 'W' signifies that this is a workstation series and the 'X' the usual xtreme nonsense we suppose. Along with the 2990WX there will also be a 24-core/48-thread model known as the 2970WX, though that model won’t be available until October.


Read full article @ TechSpot

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX and 2950X Review
Exactly 1 year and 3 days ago AMD launched their first generation of Ryzen Threadripper processors, the 1950X and 1920X. Today, they officially launch their brand new Threadripper 2990WX and refreshed 2950X CPUs, which offer improvements over their predecessors in both core count and frequency. AMD has even re-branded their 2990WX to let people know that the new monster 32-core 64-thread CPU is designed for content creators and "prosumers" rather than average consumers. By leveraging the top 5% of Ryzen dies, EPYC's quad-die formation, and lessons learned over the past year, AMD is poised to bring more competition to the high-end consumer CPU market. Let's see how the new CPUs do. We should also mention that the samples used in this review have all been provided to us by AMD and Intel for testing purposes, and that AMD flew us to Italy with the rest of the technical press to brief us on these new processors.


Read full article @ TweakTown

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX CPU Review
Just over a year ago, AMD's Ryzen Threadripper CPUs delivered more cores to demanding users for less money than the competition, and that formula proved successful in re-establishing AMD as a player in high-end desktop systems. As a matter of fact, AMD says its 16-core, 32-thread Threadripper 1950X was its best-selling high-end desktop part. Despite the copious compute resources on offer from the top-end Threadripper, the company heard from customers who wanted even more from their high-end desktops.


Read full article @ The Tech Report

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX overclocked to 5.4 GHz
AMD Ryzen Threadripper, world's first 32-core consumer CPU, has been overclocked to 5.4 GHz. Threadripper 2990WX @ 5.4 GHz Alva Jonathan aka Lucky_N00b overclocked AMD's flagship HEDT CPU to staggering 5.4 GHz. Such frequency is achievable with liquid nitrogen and extremely low temperature (we are talking ~184C here). Alva used MSI's X399 MEG Creation with custom LN2 BIOS and 16GB of DDR memory clocked at 3.4 GHz and very tight timings. It is said that such frequencies turn Threadripper into an extremely power hungry chip. A 5.3 GHz frequency already requires more than 1000W.


Read full article @ VideoCardz.com

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX Processor Review
Today, AMD introduced the first 32-core desktop processor for the consumer market with the Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX 32-core, 64-thread behemoth. This processor is the successor to the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X 16-core, 32-thread processor that was released just last year. In just one year we are witnessing the core count double on consumer processors and better yet, this is a drop-in replacement for the 1950X. You just need to update the UEFI (no CPU required) on the AMD X399 motherboard that you’d like to use and that is it. AMD wants to give consumers all the compute power they want for a High-End DeskTop (HEDT) system. Putting all those cores in your next system build will set you back $1799 for the 2990WX, but you can also buy a 24-core version for $1299 (2970WX), a 16-core version for $899 (2950X) and a 12-core version for $649 (2920X).


Read full article @ Legit Reviews

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX Review
The regular Ryzen processor series has been refreshed, now the turn goes to AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors receiving that Pinnacle Ridge upgrade. In this review we check out the all-new 32-core / 64-threads flagship Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX, oh - we have some test results to share with you alright, welcome to the multi- and many core revolution.

WX - Yeah you will have noticed it, two out of the four newly announced Threadripper Generation2 processors carry a WX suffix. WX is used in AMD's PRO series product line. Basically, anything upwards to 16 cores will carry the X suffix, with the 24 and 32 core versions having that WX suffix for designers and creators. Realistically though, if you think a 24 or 32 core processor is a proper gaming CPU, think again and get yourself a six-core proc. That many cores are for pure bragging rights or more professional workloads like virtualization, raytracing rendering and video editing and rendering. None the less, the new SKUs are injected into the consumer domain. Based on 12nm ZEN+ Pinnacle Ridge dies, there will be four new generation 2 SKUs, up-to 16 cores the 2920X (12c/24t) and 2950X (16c/32t). The new WX series, yes 24 cores and 48 threads for the 2970X and then that beast, the 32-core 2990WX processor with its staggering 64-threads, which is unprecedented in the SOHO and consumer class. Let me quickly add that drop in compatibility is confirmed, existing X399 motherboards will work with a BIOS firmware update. The four models will be released gradually over the coming months, today, however, we kick off with the 32-core version and trust me, CPU benchmarking never was this fast :-)


Read full article @ The Guru of 3D

AMD Threadripper 2950X 16 Core 32 Thread Processor Review
Round two, the encore, the sequel, whatever you want to call it, Threadripper is back to tear the competition a new one. AMD is going big with the performance upgrades here. While Threadripper’s first launch offered some truly spectacular price to performance ratios, the latest one promises to do even better. While the 2950X isn’t the top dog of the range, it still offers 16 Cores and 32 Threads of processing. What’s more amazing is that it does it for well under $1000. That’s more performance and a lower price than the first launch of Threadripper, so we’re already off to a great start today.

Since Threadripper is based on Ryzen technology, it retains and expands on the same feature set. You still get the fantastic SenseMI technology that overclocks the CPU on-the-fly to manage performance and temperatures. You also have the even more amazing Master Utility, one of the easiest to use overclocking tools to date, and much more.


Read full article @ eTeknix

AMD Threadripper 2950X Offers Great Linux Performance At $900 USD
The embargo has expired now for talking about Threadripper 2 performance figures... First up are our initial Threadripper 2950X Linux benchmarks. In this article are the most interesting metrics for this 16-core / 32-thread processor while in the just-published AMD Threadripper 2990WX Linux Benchmarks are a lot more figures complemented by the 2950X and other CPUs plus power consumption numbers, etc. This article is most useful if specifically focused on the performance of the Threadripper 2950X that comes in at $899 USD.


Read full article @ Phoronix

AMD Threadripper 2990WX 32-Core and 2950X 16-Core Review
If you live by the workstation, you die by the performance. When it comes to processing data, throughput is key: the more a user can do, the more projects are accomplished, and the more contracts can be completed. This means that workstation users are often compute bound, and like to throw resources at the problem, be it cores, memory, storage, or graphics acceleration. AMD’s latest foray into the mix is its second generation Threadripper product, also known as Threadripper 2, which breaks the old limit on cores and pricing: the 2990WX gives 32 cores and 64 threads for only $1799. There is also the 2950X, with 16 cores and 32 threads, for a new low of $849. We tested them both.


Read full article @ Anandtech

AMD Threadripper 2990WX Cooling Performance - Testing Five Heatsinks & Two Water Coolers
The 32-core / 64-thread AMD Threadripper 2990WX carries a 250 Watt TDP rating, thus the cooling performance is quite important especially if you don't want to hit any thermal throttling with this $1799 USD processor. Fortunately, the 2990WX doesn't require water cooling but actually can work quite well with high-end air heatsinks too. For adding some perspective on the cooling requirements of the Threadripper 2990WX, here are benchmarks of five heatsinks and two all-in-one water cooling systems.


Read full article @ Phoronix

AMD Threadripper 2990WX Linux Benchmarks: The 32-Core / 64-Thread Beast
Whether you are compiling a lot of code, rendering models with Blender, or running various scientific workloads with OpenMP or MPI, the AMD Threadripper 2990WX is capable of delivering immersive Linux performance with its 32-cores and 64 total threads. While coming in at $1800 USD, the AMD Threadripper 2990WX can deliver better performance than the more expensive Intel Core i9 7980XE. Beyond being mesmerized about the performance today with this high-end desktop/workstation processor with the many thread-happy Linux workloads we encounter daily, this 32-core Zen+ processor has us even more eager to see AMD's next-generation Zen2-based EPYC CPUs next year.


Read full article @ Phoronix

ASUS ROG SWIFT PG27UQ Monitor Review
A topic of long discussion and wait, announced a long time ago are Ultra HD screens, capable of a serious HDR1000 level peak brightness in combination with G-Sync. They are finally here and Nvidia has been all over these screens, even mandating and telling ASUS what and when to release it in an effort to continue developing and tweaking the panels up-to a level they can work with, and certify it. Yes, the trend for monitors this year and the years to come definitely is HDR and local dimming. HDR, however, has been a confusing topic to talk about with some monitors that have been tagged as 'HDR compatible' offering laughable low amounts of nits in the 300~350 cd/m2 range. Meanwhile, Nvidia is going aggressive with Ultra HD HDR GSYNC certified displays reaching a required peak level of 1000 nits, however, with prices easily doubled for that amount of nits. True dat, very few people can actually buy the new 27" panel formats (Ultra HD) goodness. Here in the Netherlands, we heard that merely a hundred units will be available in e-tail.

I'll immediately jump into my journalistic operating mode though, 27-inches for Ultra HD, isn't that a bit of a silly resolution DPI scaling wise? Is Ultra HD is the best choice at this moment in time? Personally, and a lot of people will frown at me right now, I do not believe so, at 24 inches up to 32 inches I feel panels at 2560x1440 or 3440x1440 are far better suited for the job, at a much lower price and a lesser need of graphics horsepower. However, I can only form an opinion on these monitors once I actually have tested one myself right? So with that in mind I just had to review the ASUS ROG SWIFT PG27UQ, a monitor that is currently priced at a nearly nauseating € 2.599,- This 27-inch ASUS 3840x2160 gaming monitor can drive the AOC panel at 144Hz combined with G-Sync (which eliminates stutter and tearing) while gaming in a HDR10 or compatible mode. This bad bot has 384 local dimming zones lighting system that will offer a peak brightness of 1000 Nits, it supports a DCI-P3 color space similar to what Hollywood uses in movies. A monitor offering image quality, connectivity, and features, lots of features that appeal to any PC gamer.


Read full article @ The Guru of 3D

Best PC Cases 2018: Our Tested Picks for Your New Build
Here are the best cases for custom PC builds. Our recommendations factor in cooling and noise, and many sell for less than $100. There's far more to consider than attractive looks when choosing a case. Good airflow is key when it comes to keeping your components cool, and noise levels can be affected by everything from the number and type of fans you use to the shape of the fan mounts. Size is also important. You need a case that's big enough to accept the components you have today, as well as what you might want to add in the future.

Choose the right case and it could serve you well through multiple PC builds, thus saving you hundreds of dollars. Pick one that you don't really like to look at, or that doesn't fit the graphics card you decide you want a few months down the line, and you might be looking to replace it before that new case smell starts to fade. But with hundreds of available options, from closet-like EATX chassis to tiny sub-shoebox-size Mini-ITX models, where do you start? You're in the right place.


Read full article @ Tom's Hardware

BlitzWolf BW-ANC1 Active Noise Cancelling Bluetooth Earphones Review
If you're out in the market for a brand new set of wireless earphones which you can use both at home or while away or even while on the road there are currently three products you can choose from. So you can either go with one of the all-time classic (yet bulky) over the ear models, get an regular set of in-ear wireless earphones (best combination between size and stability) or if size is an issue and you'd like the most compact form factor available currently you can always opt for a set of wireless earbuds. Personally i could never see myself wearing a wireless over the ear model due to size so I’ve always used regular wireless earphones and as of late quite a few wireless earbuds. BlitzWolf may not be the first name to come in mind when we're talking about wireless earphones but in the just 3 years they've been around their products have been embraced by people all over the world so when they reached out to us and asked if we'd be interested in testing their new BW-ANC1 Active Noise Cancelling Bluetooth Earphones we said yes.

It all started early 2015 with a simple, bold idea: make what customers really want not just what they need. Our unlimited passion for technology and relentless pursuit of innovation drives us to deliver ground-breaking new technologies and excitement in ways that only BlitzWolf can. Our solutions are renowned for their iconic ergonomic design, incomparable price and high performance. Trusted by many customers around the world, BlitzWolf continues to create products with uncompromising quality that not only inspires, but also it transcend geography, customs, and cultures. Welcome to BlitzWolf. We will simplify your life.


Read full article @ NikKTech

Bond Home Smart Ceiling Fan Controller Review
The Bond Home Smart Ceiling Fan Controller is a device that promises to make your non-smart home devices smart, providing they are controlled by RF (Radio Frequency) or IR (Infrared). Using the Bond Home you can not only control ceiling fans; but air conditioners, garage doors, etc. Not only does it claim to give you full control of these devices remotely, you also can control these devices with Amazon Alexa and Google Home products.


Read full article @ Bigbruin.com

Corsair Carbide SPEC-06 RGB Review
The Carbide Series has been a highly active range for Corsair – boasting an astounding forty varied models. The portfolio is filled with enclosures which are largely associated with value for money, blending great aesthetics with useful features.

The SPEC-06 RGB was added to the Carbide lineup a few weeks back and this new mid-tower arrives in black or white, with a tempered glass panel and integrated RGB lighting. There is also a non-RGB version which lacks the ability to have the colour adjusted.


Read full article @ Vortez

Corsair SPEC Omega RGB Review
The case industry in recent years has really started to diversify itself in the 'looks' department. On the one hand, you have your NZXT S340 Elites, Fractal Meshify, and 275R's. They're sleek, very minimalistic, and discreet. Aside from the tempered glass, they are designed to be stylish but let your PC's internals do all the talking. At the other end, however, we have cases like the one have here today. The Spec Omega RGB from Corsair absolutely screams 'look at me' as loudly as the components may do inside it. Packing a full length tempered glass panel, included 120mm RGB fans, and space for even a granddad sized 360mm radiator, the Omega RGB seems - on the surface - to come equipped with virtually everything the modern PC builder may need. I must say, I was actually surprised by this case's ability to house an enthusiast class radiator, as I have always seen that as the domain of the high end, or the full towers. Perhaps I need to change that assumption? It's fair to say that this case is aimed squarely at 'looks' fans, but it's also equally safe to bet that this chassis would be friendly to builder's of all types in terms of familiarity to the hobby. In my experience, Corsair has always been excellent at designing their cases with both practicality, looks, and ease of use in mind. This was exemplified well (recently in fact) by their 280X chassis, which Hilbert reviewed here, for all those interested.

Naturally, the Omega RGB is, effectively, a release of the now well-known Alpha/Omega series of cases from Corsair, just with added RGB fans and the ability to integrate with iCUE and Link software natively. It does this by the inclusion of a Lighting Node PRO LED controller, a product I have used before. It is the same hub that comes with a purchase of a 3 pack of Corsair's LL or ML fans. It works exceptionally well when paired with the appropriate Corsair software, so I have no doubts the same will carry on here and provide a justification for this case's notably elevated price tag over the original Spec, Spec Alpha, and Spec Omega. Speaking of that, how much does she cost? Well, at a fairly cool 149.99 USD from Corsair's site, it's not entirely inaccurate to say that this case carries a high-end price tag. A fair whack of this price can be put down to the inclusion of the RGB fans and Lighting Node PRO, which on their own are close to 60 USD. The fans themselves, HD120's, are also fairly expensive at over 30 USD. So, if you think about it, the case is 49.99 without accessories, so you're actually saving a buck or two and getting that RGB goodness. Win-win?


Read full article @ The Guru of 3D

Fnatic STREAK Review
It seems like full-sized mechanical keyboards are everywhere and with pretty much every peripheral maker having at least one or two models, that is no surprise. The keyboard market is very large, and companies want to be a part of that, but that means that it is tougher than ever for consumers to select from the broad range of offerings. Today we’ll be taking a look at one such offering from Fnatic Gear, and that is in the shape of their STREAK which is a Cherry MX equipped mechanical keyboard.

The Fnatic STREAK shares a lot of its core components with its smaller sibling the miniSTREAK. These include the same selection of switches available of which there are four flavours. Our sample comes with the Cherry MX Red Silent, but the STREAK can be purchased with either the MX Blue, Brown or Red, each of which has their own character traits. The Red Silent we have behave very similarly to the regular MX Reds but are quieter, this makes them ideal for streamers that use a sensitive mic for streaming or for those that don’t like the noise Cherry Reds make. Other identical features include a 1000Hz polling rate, an NXP Microcontroller, fully customisable RGB illumination and more. What is different though is the integrated USB pass-through, full-size numpad and the addition of a metal volume control wheel.


Read full article @ Vortez

Gigabyte B450 Aorus Pro Review
We review the Gigabyte B450 Aorus Pro, optimized for Ryzen processors, and in specific the new Ryzen 2000 / Zen+. The new B450 series chipset based board offer some more appealing value, as budget wise these board sell at a sub 125,- USD/EUR price point, and Gigabyte certainly chucked this board full with features. So much so that you cannot really look at it as a budget offering anymore.

Yeah, Zen+ was launched in April, aka Ryzen 2000 or 12nm optimized Ryzen processors, the 'refresh' SKUs so to say. The new 12nm Zen+ processors will work fine with your X370 chipset based motherboard and vice versa, however, AMD launched the X470 chipset alongside these new Zen+ processors. The new chipset offers small improvements in combo with the new 12nm products. For example, to better facilitate XFR2 options. It has been a year already ever since AMD launched the first generation Ryzen processors. It had a bit of a rocky launch with the inter-core latency discussion a 1080p gaming performance as well as memory support. But the tide definitely turned for AMD as more and more people are considering to purchase an AMD processor-based PC, for their next purchase. The memory compatibility issues are mostly all gone, of course, we'll look at game performance in this article as well. But yes, things are looking good. The new 12nm processor generation can be clocked a notch higher. The upper range frequencies at 4.2~4.3 now are feasible, that also means that on the lower end of the spectrum, AMD is now capable to increase base-clock performance ion the more high-end parts. All these little tweaks bring the benefit of an overall faster processor series. Add to that improved memory latency and improved XFR2 ranges and you'll notice that the new ZEN+ generation now has become a really viable and more competitive product. So the ones that have not made a move towards AMD Ryzen just yet, now potentially could or will.


Read full article @ The Guru of 3D

How To Test Memory Using MemTest86 Guide
If you have any sort of system stability issues, starting with the memory is generally a good bet. It is often people skip testing system memory for defects or the root cause of a system crash because it is often seen as an unnecessary computer component. In reality, it is one of the most important hardware components in any computer. If your system memory is failing, it can account for random lockups, failed POST screens, and an assortment of strange computer issues.


Read full article @ OCC

Moto Z3 Review
Motorola has had some solid smartphones this year. The firm always provides some of the best value in the budget arena, and you won't get a better smartphone for $249 than the Moto G6. The Moto Z3 Play was pretty good as well, even if it was priced a bit high.

A couple of weeks ago, the company announced its long-awaited 2018 flagship, the Moto Z3. Unfortunately, the handset is far less than exciting, with last year's Snapdragon 835 chipset, along with a display and body that matches the Moto Z3 Play.


Read full article @ Neowin

MSI B450 Tomahawk Review
We review the MSI B450 Tomahawk, based on the new B450 chipset it is aimed at for Ryzen processors, and in specific the new Ryzen 2000 / Zen+. The new B450 series chipset based board offer some more appealing value, as budget wise this board sells at a sub 109,- USD/EUR price point. It is a lovely looking value alternative and hey, there's very little LED bling as also.

Yeah, Zen+ was launched in April, aka Ryzen 2000 or 12nm optimized Ryzen processors, the 'refresh' SKUs so to say. The new 12nm Zen+ processors will work fine with your X370 chipset based motherboard and vice versa, however, AMD launched the X470 chipset alongside these new Zen+ processors. The new chipset offers small improvements in combo with the new 12nm products. For example, to better facilitate XFR2 options. It has been a year already ever since AMD launched the first generation Ryzen processors. It had a bit of a rocky launch with the inter-core latency discussion a 1080p gaming performance as well as memory support. But the tide definitely turned for AMD as more and more people are considering to purchase an AMD processor-based PC, for their next purchase. The memory compatibility issues are mostly all gone, of course, we'll look at game performance in this article as well. But yes, things are looking good. The new 12nm processor generation can be clocked a notch higher. The upper range frequencies at 4.2~4.3 now are feasible, that also means that on the lower end of the spectrum, AMD is now capable to increase base-clock performance ion the more high-end parts. All these little tweaks bring the benefit of an overall faster processor series. Add to that improved memory latency and improved XFR2 ranges and you'll notice that the new ZEN+ generation now has become a really viable and more competitive product. So the ones that have not made a move towards AMD Ryzen just yet, now potentially could or will.


Read full article @ The Guru of 3D

MSI B450i Gaming PLUS AC Review
We're downsizing! Read our review of the new the MSI B450i Gaming PLUS AC review, based on the new B450 chipset it is aimed at for Ryzen processors, and in specific the new Ryzen 2000 / Zen+. And with a 17x17cm, mini-ITX form factor this puppy is small, offers value and really has it all.

Yeah, Zen+ was launched in April, aka Ryzen 2000 or 12nm optimized Ryzen processors, the 'refresh' SKUs so to say. The new 12nm Zen+ processors will work fine with your X370 chipset based motherboard and vice versa, however, AMD launched the X470 chipset alongside these new Zen+ processors. The new chipset offers small improvements in combo with the new 12nm products. For example, to better facilitate XFR2 options. It has been a year already ever since AMD launched the first generation Ryzen processors. It had a bit of a rocky launch with the inter-core latency discussion a 1080p gaming performance as well as memory support. But the tide definitely turned for AMD as more and more people are considering to purchase an AMD processor-based PC, for their next purchase. The memory compatibility issues are mostly all gone, of course, we'll look at game performance in this article as well. But yes, things are looking good. The new 12nm processor generation can be clocked a notch higher. The upper range frequencies at 4.2~4.3 now are feasible, that also means that on the lower end of the spectrum, AMD is now capable to increase base-clock performance ion the more high-end parts. All these little tweaks bring the benefit of an overall faster processor series. Add to that improved memory latency and improved XFR2 ranges and you'll notice that the new ZEN+ generation now has become a really viable and more competitive product. So the ones that have not made a move towards AMD Ryzen just yet, now potentially could or will.


Read full article @ The Guru of 3D

MSI MEG X399 Creation Motherboard Review
With the highly anticipated launch of AMDs second generation Threadripper processors, it gives motherboard vendors the incentive and justification to release more boards. As there aren’t tons of Threadripper 2-validated boards to currently choose from, MSI has released the new MEG X399 Creation with content creators and designers the targeted focus. This review aims to explore what the X399 Creation has to offer and see what all the fuss is about.


Read full article @ Anandtech

MSI Radeon RX 570 and 580 MECH 2 8G OC Review
We review not one, but two new graphics cards from MSI today, the Radeon RX 570 and 580 MECH 2 8G OC with 8GB graphics memory. Both two slot cooled mainstream graphics card series will allow you to play your games in both the Full HD 1080P range, as well as gaming in WQHD (2560x1440) range. This release has been delayed quite a bit, originally planned earlier the entire GPP ordeal cascaded the release of a new non gaming series. None the less, MSI has announced a new graphics card series based on the Polaris (called Ellesmere these days) series, the MECH 2 series is fitted with a thermal design offering the Radeon RX 570 and 580 a higher core and memory speeds. The shapes of the MECH series cooler are intensified by a fiery red glow piercing through the cover, while the MSI dragon RGB LED on the top can be set to any of 16.7 million colors to match your mood or build.

The MECH 2 have new completely custom PCB design featuring enhanced power design (8 phases) with Military Class 4 components enables higher stable performance to push your graphics card to the max. A matte black metal backplate shows the MECH 2 cards more structural strength and provides a nice finishing touch.


Read full article @ The Guru of 3D

NETGEAR Orbi (RBK23) AC2200 Mesh Wi-Fi System Review
NETGEAR kicked off the spate of mesh networking systems we have seen over the last couple of years with the Orbi RBK50. Since then, many more alternatives have passed through our test benches, many of which we covered in our Ultimate Mesh WiFi Router Shootout. Whilst the RBK50 remains the gold standard for performance, it also remains pricey, and the units are bulky. So NETGEAR has introduced a smaller, more modestly priced option, available as a two-unit (RBK20) and three-unit (RBK23) bundle.

Whereas the original RBK50 was AC3000 rated, the RBK20/23 only offers AC2200. However, unlike ASUS’s Lyra Trio, this isn’t because of a drop to a dual-band radio configuration. The RBK20/23 units are still tri-band. However, whilst the 2.4GHz radio still offers 400Mbits/sec of bandwidth, now both 5GHz radios use 866Mbit/sec, whereas the RBK50’s backhaul 5GHz radio operates at 1,733Mbits/sec.


Read full article @ KitGuru

Noctua NH-U12S TR4-SP3: Legendary Cooling Comes to Threadripper
Hello, Noctua NH-U12S. Meet AMD Threadripper. Traditional Noctua design and the world-class cooling ability of the NH-U12S is now available for Threadripper, and the result is marvelous, just as we expected. The slim design cooling tower sparkles with its five, polished nickel heatpipes tower while barely uttering a whisper with its NF-F12 PWM (pulse width modulation, for controlling fans) 120mm fan while providing great thermal cooling to AMD’s flagship CPU line.


Read full article @ Tom's Hardware

NVIDIA's Next-Gen Turing GPU: All You Need To Know
The new Turing GPU architecture is the most advanced GPU architecture NVIDIA has ever made, with NVIDIA having two "engines" at the core of the Turing GPU architecture. The first is the accelerating Ray Tracing, while the other side of Turing handles acceleration of AI Inferencing. Turing is by and far not a gaming GPU in any way shape or form here, with NVIDIA unveiling not one but three new Quarto RTX branded professional graphics cards. The new Quadro RTX graphics cards all feature RT cores (Ray Tracing Cores) as well as Tensor Cores for deep learning acceleration, but NVIDIA hasn't been clear on whether the Tensor Cores have been tweaked under Turing compared to the Volta GPU architecture.


Read full article @ TweakTown

NZXT E850 850W Gold Digital Power Supply Review
NZXT is no stranger to Play3r with their bold and clean-cut PC cases being a regular feature here, but today we’re taking a look at their latest power supply, the NZXT E850 850W power supply which features an 80PLUS Gold efficiency rating. Also featured are digital temperature and voltage monitoring for real-time streaming across the CAM software which provides information vital to the operation of a system.

Let’s take a look and see if NZXT can be the style innovator that they’re already established as, and if the new E-Series E850 has enough features to make it worthy of the $149.99 price tag!


Read full article @ Play3r

PC Buyers Guide Summer 2018
Welcome, all to the (Late) Summer 2018 edition of Guru3D's PC Buyer's Guide. This article will show you PC builds at various price points that we - as a unit - feel happy to recommend.

Since this guide was last written, the pricing of GPUs has - thankfully - seen a return to more normal levels. DDR4 memory is still outpriced and takes up far too much of a build's budget (for our liking), but you cannot have everything. As such, the general advice we would offer is to buy the fastest memory you can get your hands on. Ideally, especially for systems running AMD Ryzen CPUs, this should be in the 2933-3200 MHz range. With that said, if your budget only goes so far and getting faster memory means getting a lower end CPU or GPU (especially the latter), then, by all means, get the slower memory. A faster graphics processor will ultimately make a much bigger difference to your gaming experience than faster RAM will.


Read full article @ The Guru of 3D

Ryzen Threadripper 2 (2990WX and 2950X) Review
AMD is building on the success of its high-end desktop Ryzen Threadripper processors with a handful of powerful new models known as the Threadripper 2000-Series or, unofficially, Threadripper 2.

The flagship Threadripper 2990WX is an $1800 beast armed with an incredible 32 Zen+-based cores and the ability to work on 64 threads concurrently. Threadripper 2970WX wields 24 cores and 48 threads, plus lower boost frequencies, but also pushes pricing down to $1300. Those are both quad-die configurations. AMD is also updating its dual-die line-up with the Threadripper 2950X, wielding 16 Zen+ cores for $900, and Threadripper 2920X, sporting 12 cores and the ability to work on 24 threads concurrently for $650. The 2950X, specifically, serves up impressive value across a diverse range of workloads. It may very well be the CPU to beat in today's high-end desktop market.


Read full article @ Tom's Hardware

The Mega-Tasking Test: AMD Threadripper 2990WX Heavy Multitasking Benchmark
After our long look at the new Threadripper 2990WX and 2950X processors, many called us out on benchmarks that only ran a single application at a time. We had already planned to make a separate multi-tasking focused benchmark, and so here we are after a few additional days of testing with more results to discuss.


Read full article @ TechSpot




Printed from NT Compatible (https://www.ntcompatible.com/news/story/amd_threadripper_2950x_16_core_32_thread_processor_reviews_and_more.html)