Intel Announces Xeon E7 v4 Processors and more
Posted on: 06/06/2016 07:52 AM

Here a roundup of today's reviews and articles:

Cooler Master V750 750W Power Supply Review
Intel Announces Xeon E7 v4 Processors For Mission-Critical Computing And The Cloud
Intel Core i7-6950X Broadwell-E Review
NEC EA305WMi 30-inch 16:10 IPS Monitor Review
Seagate Personal Cloud Pro (2-Bay) 4TB NAS Review

Cooler Master V750 750W Power Supply Review
"I am an expert in Korean culture," I explained to my friend. "I watched one Korean drama, I eat at the Korean BBQ House at the university food court, I own a Samsung TV, and I even have some Korean friends!" My friend looked at me, laughed, and said, "Jonathan, that is not how it works." Now, obviously I was joking, and other than the fact I just admitted I watched a Korean drama (Descendants of the Sun is really good, by the way) -- albeit with English subtitles -- I think this brings about the question: What makes someone an expert in a certain culture? Although it will probably take more than an APH Networks review introduction to answer this question, I think the better way of putting it is, being an expert in a certain culture takes a lot more than scraping the surface with a few superficial things, even if my Korean friends think the place at the university food court genuinely has pretty good quality food. As we take a look at the Cooler Master V750 750W power supply today, we are posed with a similar question: What makes a power supply a good power supply? Is it the efficiency certification, modularity of the cables, dimensions of the enclosure, or the quietness of its internal cooling fan? While all these are totally valid contributing factors, I think there is more to the story. Although it will definitely take more than an APH Networks review introduction to answer this question, the good news is we have the next four pages to address this in abundant detail. We looked at every detail of the Cooler Master V750 750W both outside and inside, and let nothing slip under the radar. Read on to find out what we have found!


Read full article @ APH Networks

Intel Announces Xeon E7 v4 Processors For Mission-Critical Computing And The Cloud
Back in March, Intel launched its Xeon Processor E5 v4 family of products, based on the Broadwell-EP core. We had the chance to evaluate a dual Xeon E5-2697 v4-based system with a total of 36 cores (72 Threads) and discussed the changes and new features in Broadwell-EP at the time. As powerful as that 36-core system was, the E5 v4 family is not Intel’s top-end server offering. That designation belongs to the Xeon E7 v4 product family being announced today, which typically features more cores and cache and support for additional sockets...


Read full article @ HotHardware

Intel Core i7-6950X Broadwell-E Review
Meet Broadwell-E: Hide Your Credit Card: Intel has officially unveiled Broadwell-E, which consists of four processors covering 6, 8 and 10-core configurations. These chips differ quite a bit in terms of specifications and pricing, all the more reason to explore them in better detail.


Read full article @ TechSpot

NEC EA305WMi 30-inch 16:10 IPS Monitor Review
16:10 is an uncommon aspect ratio these days but NEC has introduced an excellent new 30-inch screen – the EA305WMi. It sports a wide gamut with a GB-r-LED backlight driving an AH-IPS panel. We’re checking it out today.

It’s a fact that if one buys a computer monitor today, it will almost surely come in a 16:9 aspect ratio. But one doesn’t have to set their time machine too far in the past to find an era when this wasn’t the case. Like televisions of yore, desktop displays also conformed to a 4:3 ratio. This was ideal for just about any computing task and even today would work well for web browsing, document creation or even gaming.


Read full article @ Tom's Hardware

Seagate Personal Cloud Pro (2-Bay) 4TB NAS Review
Whether you just want to share data with everyone in your house or the office or if you just want your data to be accessible from anywhere on the planet owning a NAS (network attached storage) device is the easy way out. Unfortunately there aren't currently many solutions in the market targeted towards home users so even the most entry-level NAS servers require quite a few steps to be taken prior to actually using them and if you're not into computers that might be hard. Seagate is one of the very first manufacturers to think of that back in 2013 when they introduced a very basic NAS aimed towards home users which they named the Central (suitable name for a device in which you can store all your media files and access them from anywhere). It wasn't however until last year when they introduced the more "advanced" Personal Cloud and Personal Cloud Pro (2-Bay) models again aimed at home users and today with us we have the 4TB model.

Founded in 1979, Seagate is the leading provider of hard drives and storage solutions. From the videos, music and documents we share with friends and family on social networks, to servers that form the backbone of enterprise data centers and cloud-based computing, to desktop and notebook computers that fuel our personal productivity, Seagate products help more people store, share and protect their valuable digital content. Seagate offers the industry’s broadest portfolio of hard disk drives, solid-state drives and solid-state hybrid drives. In addition, the company offers an extensive line of retail storage products for consumers and small businesses, along with data-recovery services for any brand of hard drive and digital media type. Seagate employs more than 50,000 people around the world.

Unlike both the original Central and the Personal Cloud the Personal Cloud Pro by Seagate is a 2-Bay NAS device which is currently available in 3/4/5/6/8TB versions (no diskless version available) and its drives can be configured both in RAID 0 (increased performance) and RAID 1 (increased safety). Unfortunately using RAID 1 means you have half the advertised available capacity so our 4TB model actually goes down to 2TB with RAID 1 (prior to getting the device i was hoping Seagate had their Personal Cloud Pro devices configured only in RAID 1 for increased safety and thus the 4TB model would come with two 4TB drives inside). In terms of connectivity just like every other NAS in the market the Personal Cloud Pro connects to your local network via an 1GbE Ethernet RJ45 connector and since its main task is that of a media hub (can be used to stream media to smartphones, tablets, Roku, Google Chromecast, gaming consoles and smart TVs) it also features one USB 3.0 port and one USB 2.0 port on which you can connect external USB drives. Obviously as stated by its name the Personal Cloud Pro can also be used as a backup and sync device for mobile devices, PCs, and Macs both locally and on the cloud via a good number of compatible services (Amazon S3, Box, Baidu, Dropbox, Google Drive, HiDrive, and Yandex.Disk).


Read full article @ NikKTech




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